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Ellison article on online dating

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DOI: /JX Corpus ID: ; Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (). Managing Impressions Online Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated  · Abstract. Online dating is a popular new tool for initiating romantic relationships, although recent research and media reports suggest that it may also be fertile ground for In recent years, the use of online dating or online personals services has evolved from a marginal to a mainstream social practice. In , at least 29 million Americans (two out of  · Most prior research has focused on deception in online dating (e.g., Ellison et al., , Guadagno et al., , Hall et al., , Toma and Hancock, , Toma and Hancock, ... read more

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Related Articles: Open Access. Why Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication ACMC Is a Powerful Tool for Language Learning. Open Journal of Modern Linguistics Vol. DOI: Open Access. Emotional Awareness: An Enhanced Computer Mediated Communication Using Facial Expressions. Baltimore: University Park Press. Google Preview. Some explorations in initial interaction and beyond: Toward a developmental theory of interpersonal communication.

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Oxford: Oxford University Press. Egan , J. Love in the time of no time. The New York Times. Eisenhardt , K. Building theories from case study research. Academy of Management Review , 14 4 , — Fernandez , S. Getting to know you: Tell-all sites put online dater profiles to truth test. The Washington Post. Fiore , A. Online Personals: An Overview. Paper presented at the meeting of ACM Computer-Human Interaction , Vienna, Austria. Gershberg , M.

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Human Communication Research , 28 3 , — Turkle , S. But Chris was not the woman in the online photos. This wasn't a question of an age discrepancy or a new hairdo. She was a completely different woman. Chris was in marketing, you see, and to her it was simply a good strategy to post photographs that would draw in as many "customers" as possible.

I never said a word about the photos. I just enjoyed our conversation and the refreshments. A few weeks later I noticed that Chris had replaced the photos with those of yet another woman. In the U. alone, tens of millions of people are trying to find dates or spouses online every day. How accurate are the ads they find? And just how successful is online dating compared with conventional dating?

These and other questions have recently stimulated a small explosion of studies by social scientists. The research is quickly revealing many surprising things about the new world of online dating, and some of the findings could be of great value to the millions who now look to the Internet to find love.

Deception at Light Speed Experiences such as the one I had with Chris are multiplying by the thousands: some people online lie quite drastically about their age, marital or parental status, appearance, income or profession. There are even Web sites, such as www. com , where people go to gripe, and a few lawsuits have been filed against online services by disgruntled suitors. Just how bad is deception in online dating?

To put this issue in context, bear in mind that deception has always played at least a small role in courting. One could even argue that deception is a necessary part of wooing a potential partner "Yes, I love sports! But cyberspace introduces a host of new possibilities. Survey research conducted by media researcher Jeana Frost of Boston University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology suggests that about 20 percent of online daters admit to deception.

If you ask them how many other people are lying, however--an interviewing tactic that probably gets closer to the truth--that number jumps to 90 percent. Because self-reported data can be unreliable, especially those from people asked to confess bad things about themselves, several researchers have sought objective ways to quantify online deception.

For example, psychologist Jeffrey Hancock of Cornell University and communications professor Nicole Ellison of Michigan State University bring people into a lab, where they measure height and weight and then check the numbers against those in their online profiles. The preliminary data suggest that, on average, online profiles shave off about five pounds and add perhaps an inch in height.

According to Ellison, although deception is "fairly common, the lies are of a very small magnitude. In another attempt to collect objective data on deception, economists Guenter Hitsch and Ali Hortasu of the University of Chicago and psychologist Dan Ariely of M.

compared the heights and weights of online daters with the same statistics obtained from national census data. Like Hancock and Ellison, they found that online height is exaggerated by only an inch or so for both men and women but that women appear to understate their weight more and more as they get older: by five pounds when they are in their 20s, 17 pounds in their 30s and 19 pounds in their 40s.

For men, the major areas of deception are educational level, income, height, age and marital status; at least 13 percent of online male suitors are thought to be married.

For women, the major areas of deception are weight, physical appearance and age. All of the relevant research shows the importance of physical appearance for both sexes, and online daters interpret the absence of photos negatively. According to one recent survey, men's profiles without photos draw one fourth the response of those with photos, and women's profiles without photos draw only one sixth the response of those with photos.

If you are a Garrison Keillor fan, you have probably heard about the fictional Lake Wobegon on National Public Radio, where "all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average. Rationale for Falsehoods Why so much inaccuracy? One theory, formulated in the late s and early s by Sara Kiesler and her colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, suggests that by its very nature "computer-mediated communication" is disinhibiting, causing people to say just about anything they feel like saying.

Because people typically use screen names rather than real ones, their ramblings are anonymous and hence not subject to social norms.

There are also no physical cues or consequences--no visible communication gestures, raised eyebrows, grimaces, and so on--to keep people's behavior in check. As a result, online daters tend to construct what Ellison and her colleagues Jennifer Gibbs of Rutgers University and Rebecca Heino of Georgetown University call an "ideal self" rather than a real one.

A study published recently by Ellison and her colleagues even suggests that online daters often regret it when they do tell the truth, feeling that too much honesty, especially about negative attributes, creates a bad impression. There are also straightforward, practical reasons for lying.

Many women are quite open about listing much younger ages, often stating in the text of their profiles that they have listed a younger age to make sure they turn up in searches. Because men often use age cutoffs in their searches, women who list ages above that cutoff will never be seen.

My research assistant Rachel Greenberg and I have examined the age issue by plotting a histogram of the ages of 1, men and 1, women selected at random from the national database of Match.

com, arguably now the largest of the online matchmaking services. We speculated that from age 29 on--the point at which people in our culture tend to become sensitive about growing older--we might see some distinctive patterns in the distribution of ages [ see box on page 34 ].

Ellison, N. Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11, has been cited by the following article:. TITLE: Self-Affirmation through WeChat Moments.

AUTHORS: Xiangli Wen , Yaozhong Liu , Yakun Ni KEYWORDS: Self-Affirmation , WeChat , Moments. JOURNAL NAME: Psychology , Vol. This study examines whether viewing personal WeChat moments is self-affirmative.

Browsing WeChat moments of other people that better than yourself will lead to an upward social comparison, but the effect of browsing your own moments is rarely discussed. This study conducts an experiment, and the result proves that browsing WeChat moments is an effective self-affirmation intervention paradigm.

The self-affirmation paradigm which is close to daily life deserves further promotion and research. Related Articles:. Login 切换导航. Home Articles Journals Books News About Submit. Home References Article citations. Journals A-Z. Journals by Subject. Publish with us. Paper Submission Information for Authors Peer-Review Resources Open Special Issues Open Access Statement Frequently Asked Questions.

Follow SCIRP. Contact us. customer scirp. x has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Self-Affirmation through WeChat Moments AUTHORS: Xiangli Wen , Yaozhong Liu , Yakun Ni KEYWORDS: Self-Affirmation , WeChat , Moments JOURNAL NAME: Psychology , Vol. Related Articles: Open Access. Why Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication ACMC Is a Powerful Tool for Language Learning. Open Journal of Modern Linguistics Vol. DOI: Open Access. Emotional Awareness: An Enhanced Computer Mediated Communication Using Facial Expressions.

Social Networking Vol. Indicators of Computer-Mediated Communication Affecting Remote Employee Engagement. Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies Vol.

Online Stability Assessment in Control Room Environment. Journal of Power and Energy Engineering Vol. The Impact of Computer Mediated Communication CMC on Productivity and Efficiency in Organizations: A Case Study of an Electrical Company in Trinidad and Tobago.

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The truth about lying in online dating profiles,Related Topics

In recent years, the use of online dating or online personals services has evolved from a marginal to a mainstream social practice. In , at least 29 million Americans (two out of  · Abstract. Online dating is a popular new tool for initiating romantic relationships, although recent research and media reports suggest that it may also be fertile ground for  · Although previous research has explored relationship development and self-presentation online (Bargh, McKenna, & Fitzsimons, ; McLaughlin, Osbourne, & Ellison, Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (). Managing Impressions Online Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated DOI: /JX Corpus ID: ; Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment  · Most prior research has focused on deception in online dating (e.g., Ellison et al., , Guadagno et al., , Hall et al., , Toma and Hancock, , Toma and Hancock, ... read more

Although the notion of circumvention is certainly not new to CMC researchers, this article seeks to highlight the importance of circumvention practices when studying the social aspects of technology use. Gershberg , M. The interview database consisted of pages, including , words, with an average of words per interview. Thirty-four interviews were conducted in June and July This is one of several reasons, according to McDermott, why many paying members get frustrated by a lack of response to their e-mails; the vast majority of people in the profiles simply cannot respond. One theory, formulated in the late s and early s by Sara Kiesler and her colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, suggests that by its very nature "computer-mediated communication" is disinhibiting, causing people to say just about anything they feel like saying. How could an online test possibly determine whether you should be paired with someone similar or with someone different, or with some magic mix?

See Subscription Options, ellison article on online dating. To compensate for or to circumvent these constraints, participants tried to create profiles that stood out or evidenced aspects of self that they were particularly proud of rather than a laundry list of features. Publish with us. We chose to conduct interviews with online dating participants in order to gain insight into how they perceived their experiences and the processes through which they learned to avoid the pitfalls and exploit the possibilities of online dating. I thought about all the qualities that I have, you know, even if I sometimes make mistakes and stuff. EganJ. ResnickP.

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